Friday, May 31, 2013

Olney family reunion in Geelong 8 August 1999

http://olneyfamilyarchives.blogspot.com.au


In August 1999 there was an Olney family reunion in Geelong, Victoria to celebrate 150 years since the first Olney family came to Australia (Peter's family).  At this reunion a book, compiled by Keith R.Collyer "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" was launched.  Then in September 1999 I went to Brisbane for the launch of a book written by Glen Petfield "The Australian Petfield Family 1888-1999" (Joy's family). At that time neither of us knew much more than who our grand parents were.  I soon became hooked and have developed quite a passion for family history.

Much of the information I will share in these Olney blogs has come from a book compiled by Keith R.Collyer "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" in August 1999, reprinted with corrections and expanded by Joy Olney and Valmai Olney August 2006, edited by Fiona Olney-Fraser, printed and bound by Ross Olney at ROBO Marketing.
A copy of the book can be purchased by contacting Ross Olney at rosco.olney@gmail.com 

I acknowledge and give credit to the copyright work of Keith R.Collyer (desceased) in his book "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney". This extract below is from the Dedication.

"The Geelong reunion on 8 August 1999 was dedicated to Charles Olney born 1804, and his wife Martha (nee Purser) born 1806, who migrated from Pulloxhill, Bedfordshire on the "Medway" with their nine children and future son-in-law, William Rutland.  Their eldest daughter Ann was married and stayed in England.  After one hundred and two days at sea the family arrived at Point Henry near Geelong on 9 August 1849".

I have added to the blogs my own photos taken in 2007 while visiting England with family, also other family photographs taken more locally.

Descendents of  David and Louisa Olney on 8 August 1999

Descendents of David and Louisa Olney 8 August 1999

Descendents of David and Louisa Olney 8 August 1999

Olney cousins - Peter Olney, Diane Miniards, Margaret Cross, Marjorie Olney August 1999

At the reunion on 8 August 1999 I met Valmai Olney and she said there was "a difference of opinion" on some aspects of the research included in "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" reunion book. Much of the information contained in the book came from another book "From Codicote to Carievale, The Olney Family" by A.Gordon Keys. Larry Olney from Canada had engaged A.Gordon Keys at great expense to have the Olney family researched in England, taking 4 years to have the book finally published in 1991. 

I acknowledge and give credit to the copyright work of A.Gordon Keys (desceased) in his book "From Codicote to Carivale, The Olney Family".

In 2002 I went about discovering for myself what the "difference of opinion" was by reading both books and studying Valmai Olney's Family Tree - and I found the problem!

In 2003, soon after my discovery, a number of Olneys were invited by Barbara & Ross Olney to meet Larry & Anita Olney who were visiting Australia. Peter and I were asked to have Larry & Anita stay with us.  Yes, the Larry Olney who had financed the book "From Codicote to Carievale, The Olney Family".  I took courage to show Larry the error - he was very gracious in accepting the error as it was quite obvious when pointed out. 

Ross Olney and Joy Olney went about correcting and reprinting "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" in 2006. 

The error was basically about a James Olney christened 6 February 1748, married to Ann and a James Olney christened 2 August 1745, married to Anne French. They were mistaken to be the same person. James Olney born 1748 was the grandson of William and Sarah Brownsell, while James Olney born 1745 was the grandson of Richard and Mary Clarke. William and Richard were brothers.  Three generations later the book continues with the correct lineage from James Olney 1745 and Anne French.  Their son Francis Olney born 16 August 1778 and Elizabeth Irons had 10 children. Their second child was Charles Olney born 1804 and married to Martha Purser - the subjects of our reunion book.  

The emphasis of the book "From Codicote to Carievale, the Olney Family" was on "our William", "our Samuel", and "our James". It should have been about "our Richard, "our Richard" and "our James". Because A.Gordon Keys did so much research on the Olneys of that era, and as William and Richard were brothers, information about William and Sarah, Samuel and Sarah, James and Ann and their descendents has been included.  This helps us understand what life was like in those days.

The following extract is from "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" compiled by Keith R.Collyer and found in the Dedication.
 
"Charles was accidentally shot on 10 April 1868 at age 64.  He is remembered by the sad, confident and appropriate quote from Proverbs 27 on his headstone".

"Boast not thyself of tomorrow for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth."

Charles Olney is buried under a large Peppercorn Tree at Geelong Eastern Cemetery

Charles Olney's tombstone
The following extract is from "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" compiled by Keith R.Collyer in the Dedication.


"Charles Olney is buried at Geelong Eastern Cemetery (Church of England section OA506).
A plaque has since been added to the headstone in memory of Martha’s death on 7 January 1889.

Although born nearly two hundred years ago and so far away, we can experience and appreciate their care for their family - now us - in the epitaph in the Rutland family Bible."

                             
                               "Martha Olney died 7 January 1889 Dearest Grandmama"



Martha Olney 1868 in Ballarat
The following Foreword by Ross Olney is included in the book "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" compiled by Keith R.Collyer (desceased).

     "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" 

Foreword by Ross Olney November 2005

Many families write books about themselves detailing their origins and the history of the day as a result of identifying their forebears. This book is no different in that respect, however the original work was not that of an Olney by name, but by Keith R. Collyer who passed away on 14 February 2003.

Keith became interested in the Olney name as a consequence of having two great grandmothers who were born “Olneys”. He became fascinated not so much with the Olney name, but with how his two great grandmothers were or were not related to each other. He found that both great grandparents were children of Charles and Martha Olney who migrated to Australia in 1849. To add to this intrigue the two Olney sisters (Elizabeth and Emma) married two Rutland brothers (William and George). We believe they were the first Olney family to migrate to Australia however they were not the only one. How the other Olneys are related to Charles and Martha is unknown at this stage. Much of the early history in this book was researched and written by A. Gordon Keys and has progressively been updated and corrected.

Keith as a descendant of Charles and Martha Olney identified over 3000 descendants of both sex, not just “males”, with the name Olney. Keith, with the assistance of his wife Madge, Rob and Lyn Olney, my wife Barbara and I, arranged a gathering to celebrate 150 years since the arrival of Charles and Martha Olney in Australia. The first edition of the book was published to coincide with this event and over 300 people, mainly descendants, attended the reunion in Geelong on 8 August 1999.

Genealogy could be an exact science, the data is available somewhere. It is finite and many family members have knowledge of this detail or that. Unfortunately in practise, genealogy is like a game where it is easier to connect the dots than find the dots to connect. Consequently this is a “living” work. New information comes to light which can enhance, modify or make redundant what was thought to be accurate at the time; hence this book has been corrected, expanded and republished several times. This process has been assisted significantly by contributions from Valmai Olney and Joy Olney. This edition is unlikely to be the last. We will continue to look at expanding the early history of the Olneys and add to the growing list of descendants of Charles and Martha in Australia. We have an extensive database and are always happy to provide details and accept information to expand the knowledge base, and to assist people to discover their connection to Charles and Martha Olney. To access some of the data more easily and keep it up-to-date more readily, a website has been created (see inside front cover). We trust you enjoy reading this book. In turn we ask that you help us keep it “alive” by advising us of any changes, corrections, suggestions or additions.

Through the efforts and dedication of the numerous people mentioned above, many people and future generations will be able to track their connection to the arrival of Charles and Martha Olney in Australia and back to England as far as 1549.


Please note: Ross Olney is the keeper of the Olney family tree. If you have information that needs to be corrected or added to, please contact Ross direct by email -  rosco.olney@gmail.com

You can order your own hard copy of "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" by clicking on -
http://olneygenealogy.weebly.com

If you wish to contact the author of these Olney Family Archives blogs with corrections or further information, please email Joy Olney at joyolney@gmail.com

These blogs have been written as another way of sharing the Olney family history with those interested. They do not cover all branches. My interest primarily is with the "David" Olney branch with parents Charles and Martha Olney.

Peter and Joy Olney were fortunate enough to visit England in 2007 and visited many of the churches, places, houses  and villages written about in the books by Keith Collyer and A.Gordon Keys.  More recent generations in Australia are also included in the Olney Family Archives Blog.

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Origin of the Olney Surname and Village

http://olneyfamilyarchives.blogspot.com.au











The Olney Coat of Arms hereby illustrated is officially documented in Burke’s General Armory.

The original description of the Arms (Shield) is as follows;

“OR, three piles in base GU, on a canton AR, a mullet SA.”

When translated the blazon also describes the original colours of the Olney Arms as;

“Gold; three red triangles in base; on a silver square, a black star.”

Above the shield and helmet is a crest, which is described as;

“out of a gold ducal crown, a natural coloured phoenix, in the beak, a green branch.”

Olney Family Name History


The following extracts are from"The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" compiled by Keith R.Collyer Page 1.

"Until about 1100, very few English people had last names. They would be called by their first names - John, William, etc. If there hap­pened to be several of the same name in the village (say John), there were a number of ways that they could identify which John was being referred to.

One way was by some characteristic of John - John Short or John Armstrong. Another way was by his occupation - John the Mason, John the Baker, and so on. A third way was by his parentage - John, son of Robert (Robertson), John son of William (Williamson).  Another way was by place name. For example, if John had moved from the parish of Luton he might be called John of Luton. This would also hold true if he were the most important person in the village.

These 'nicknames' were temporary and at first were not carried on from father to son as surnames are today. However, by 1200 many of these surnames had stuck and probably half of the people did have fixed surnames. By the end of the 1300s this increased to three-quarters and soon all English people had surnames".

Peter & Joy Olney, Darren & Fiona, Michael, Sarah & Matthew Olney-Fraser visited Olney 2007
Darren in Olney 2007
Olney is a place name. Olney is a quiet, well-known market town on the Ouse River in Buckinghamshire. The name itself means 'Olla's Island' or 'lonely grove’.

The Bull Inn in Olney 2007

The Castle Inn in Olney 2007

The Swan Inn in Olney 2007
High Street, Olney 2007
The following extracts are from "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" compiled by Keith R.Collyer Page 1.


"Olney is a very old town. After William of Normandy defeated Harold at the Battle of Hastings, one of his first thoughts was to determine the wealth of this new country he had conquered. To do this, he sent his people into every town and village in England.  Their job was to determine who owned the land, and to calculate the value of all the property there. 

To historians and others, these records in the Doomsday Book, give an unparalleled snapshot of England in 1086, (the year it was compiled).

Olney was listed in the Doomsday Book as being owned by the Bishop of Coutances. The entry for Olney provides a fascinating description of the town:
"It answers for ten hides (a measure of land). Land for 10 ploughs... 24 villagers with five smallholders have seven ploughs, five slaves; 1 mill at 40 shillings and 200 eels; meadow for 10 ploughs; woodland for 400 pigs; in total, value, 12 pounds."    
These values were, in effect, the taxes from the town to be paid to the king".

"The town of Olney still celebrates the Shrove Tuesday Pancake Race. The ladies, all Olney residents, must wear skirts and aprons with scarves or hats as they run the 400-yard course to the porch of the church, tossing their sizzling pancakes as they go. The pancakes that survive the race are given to the bellringer, who pays with a kiss. The race was first run in 1445".


Market Place in Olney taken 2007

The Pancake Race 5 February 2008
 
Olney, once celebrated for its manufacture of bone-lace, has more recently been the centre of a boot and shoe industry. 

Bobbin Lacework memorial at William Cowper Museum in Olney 2007
Bucks Lace Industry in Olney 2007
The Olney Cobbler 2007
 
Olney Rugs 2007
 
Olney Picture Framers 2007
New Leaf of Olney - The Florist 2007

The Olney Delicatessen 2007

Alan's of Olney and Jay's of Olney 2007
The following extracts are from "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" compiled by Keith R.Collyer Page 2.

"Olney can boast of its gothic style Parish Church with its magnificient 185-foot high spire, built in 1325, beside the River Ouse. Well-known John Newton, while a slave trader, had an experience with God. He later became Curate of Olney from 1764 to 1780.  In 1779 Rev. John Newton published the “Olney Hymns”, a collection of hymns written by himself and poet Sir William Cowper. John Newton wrote 280 hymns including “Amazing Grace” and “How sweet the name of Jesus sounds”. William Cowper wrote 68 hymns including “God moves in mysterious ways” and “O for a closer walk with God”. His greatest poems “The Task” and “John Gilpin” were written while in Olney. Sir William Cowper was a frequent guest at the vicarage and lived in Olney from 1767 to 1786 residing at the house now called the Cowper–Newton Museum. A memorial to Cowper can be found in the Parish Church. John Newton and his wife Mary are buried in the Olney churchyard with a monument to mark the spot".


I acknowledge and give credit to the copyright work of Keith R.Collyer (desceased) in his book "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney". Page 1 and 2.
St Peter & St Paul Olney Parish Church 2007
John Newton Memorial Window
Interior St Peter & St Paul Olney Parish Church
Interior of  St Peter & St Paul Parish Church in Olney 2007
 
Peter could not resist the opportunity of getting in the pulpit in Olney

Vicarage where John Newton lived while Vicar at Olney 1764 - 1780.  He wrote 280 hymns including "Amazing Grace" and published the "Olney Hymns" in 1779.  William Cowper wrote 68 hymns and a frequent guest at the Vicarage.

John Newton died 1807, wife Mary died 1790.  John Newton was famous for helping to abolish the slave trade in 1807.
The Cowper & Newton Museum in Olney 2007
William Cowper's personal items
Collage of William Cowper's Photographs

William Cowper



Rev.John Newton


Please note: Ross Olney is the keeper of the Olney Family Tree.  If you have information that needs to be corrected or added to, please contact him direct by email - rosco.olney@gmail.com

You can order your own hard copy of "The Family of Charles and Martha Olney" by clicking on -
http://olneygenealogy.weebly.com

If you wish to contact the author of these Olney Family Archives blogs with corrections or further information, please contact Joy Olney via email  - joyolney@gmail.com
 
These blogs have been written as another way of sharing the Olney family history with those interested. They do not cover all branches.  My interest primarily is with the "David" Olney branch with parents Charles and Martha Olney. 

Peter and Joy Olney were fortunate enough to vist England in 2007 and visited many of the churches, places, villages and houses written about in the books by Keith Collyer and A.Gordon Keys.  More recent generations in Australia are included in the Olney Family Archives blogs.